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Common Sports Injures That We Treat

  

IT-Band Syndrome 

The Iliotibial (IT) band syndrome is a tough group of fibers that run along the outside of the thigh. The glut muscles and the tensor fascia lata muscle attach to the top, and the lower part attaches to the tibia, just below the knee. The IT Band Syndrome functions primarily as a stabilizer during running and can become irritated from overuse. Runners will usually describe pain on the outside part of the knee or lower thigh, often worsened by going up or down stairs, or getting out of a car.

Sciatica

Sciatica is actually a sign that you have an underlying problem putting pressure on a nerve in your lower back. The most common cause of this nerve compression is a bulging or herniated lumbar disc. Piriformis syndrome is another common cause of sciatica. The piriformis is a muscle that lies directly over the sciatic nerve. If this muscle becomes tight or if you have a spasm in this muscle, it puts pressure directly on the sciatic nerve. Pain that radiates from your lower (lumbar) spine to your buttock and down the back of your leg is the hallmark of sciatica. This pain can vary widely, from a mild ache to a sharp, burning sensation or excruciating discomfort.

Chondromalacia Patella

Chondromalacia patella is a common cause of kneecap pain or anterior knee pain. Often called "Runner's Knee," this condition often affects young, otherwise healthy athletes. Chondromalacia is due to an irritation of the undersurface of the kneecap. The undersurface of the kneecap, or patella, is covered with a layer of smooth cartilage. This cartilage normally glides effortlessly across the knee during bending of the joint. However, in some individuals, the kneecap tends to rub against one side of the knee joint, and the cartilage surface become irritated, and knee pain is the result.

Shin Splints

The term "shin splints" refers to pain and tenderness along or just behind the inner edge of the tibia, the large bone in the lower leg. Shin splints--or medial tibial stress syndrome as it is called by orthopaedists--usually develops after physical activity, such as vigorous exercise or sports. Repetitive activity leads to inflammation of the muscles, tendons, and periosteum (thin layer of tissue covering a bone) of the tibia, causing pain.

Plantar Fascitis

Plantar Fasciitis is inflammation of the plantar fascia or arch tendon of the foot. It is an overuse injury causing heel pain which may radiate forward into the foot. Plantar fasciitis can also be known as a heel spur although they are not strictly the same. A heel spur is a bony growth that occurs at the attachment of the plantar fascia to the heel bone (calcaneus). A heel spur can occur (with repetitive pulling of the plantar fascia) on a foot with no symptoms at all and a painful heel can have no heel spur present.

Achilles Tendonitis

Achilles tendonitis is a condition of irritation and inflammation of the large tendon in the back of the ankle. Achilles tendonitis is a common overuse injury that tends to occur in middle-age recreational athletes. The overuse causes inflammation that can lead to pain and swelling. Furthermore, Achilles tendonitis can lead to small tears within the tendon, and make it susceptible to rupture.

Tennis & Golfers Elbow

Tennis elbow (lateral epicondylitis) is one of several overuse injuries that can affect your elbow. As you might guess, playing tennis is one cause of tennis elbow - but many other common activities can cause tennis elbow, too. The pain of tennis elbow occurs primarily where the tendons of your forearm muscles attach to the bony prominence on the outside of your elbow (lateral epicondyle). Pain can also spread into your forearm and wrist. Tennis elbow is similar to golfer's elbow. But golfer's elbow occurs on the inside - rather than on the outside - of your elbow.

Other Injuries That We Treat

~Muscle Strain/Sprain~

~Low Back Pain~

~Neck Pain~

~Shoulder Pain~

~Ankle Sprains~

 

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